Caregiver

Helping Parents Transition to Memory Care

Helping Parents Transition to Memory Care

Deciding to make the transition to a memory care community is rarely easy. Making the decision to transition your parent to a memory care community can be even harder. Many times, the decision to move or even considering a transition can be riddled with guilt and sadness. When parents are suffering from memory loss, they are often unable to make decisions for themselves, and if moving to a memory care community was not something previously spoken about, it can leave you as a caregiver to make this difficult decision for them.

Making the Move to Memory Care Assisted Living

Making the Move to Memory Care Assisted Living

As a loved one’s Alzheimer’s disease or dementia progresses, their need for additional care and supervision may increase. As one of the most challenging aspects of caring for someone with memory loss is actually recognizing when that level of care is needed, it’s important to look for certain signs it may be time to begin considering your options. Though you may want to keep them at home, the level of care that they need cannot always feasibly be obtained in a home setting, and memory care assisted living may need to be considered. 

Improving Balance to Prevent Falls

Improving Balance to Prevent Falls

As seniors age, shaky balance and decreased stability can increase their risk for falls. These changes that occur with aging are often thought to be just a symptom that needs to be dealt with and simply put up with, however, they do not have to be. By understanding what causes falls, how to prevent them and what exercises to do in order to improve balance, falls can be prevented and avoided, leaving seniors to live a healthy and active lifestyle for as long as possible. 

The Use of Therapeutic Fibbing for Loved Ones with Dementia

The Use of Therapeutic Fibbing for Loved Ones with Dementia

As loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia age, they may begin to lose touch with reality. They may believe that things or people are there that are not or that someone they loved is coming over when, in reality, they have passed away long ago. Occurrences such as these can be difficult to go through, and even harder to watch your loved one experience. You may be tempted to bring them back into reality by telling them that there is nothing there or that their loved one is gone, but this will likely agitate them and do more harm than good.

Assisted Living vs. Home Care: Weighing the Options

Assisted Living vs. Home Care: Weighing the Options

As seniors and those we love begin to age, the need for care tends to increase. When this happens, it can cause stress and confusion about where to go from here. In a sea of senior care options, assisted living and home care are the most frequently debated. This is caused by the need to feel comfortable and stick with what we know, but this is not necessarily the best choice to make. When the time comes to choose between assisted living and home care, it is important to consider each option and the pros and cons of each.

Respite Care: Providing the Break the Caregivers and Loved Ones Need

Respite Care

As Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia begins to progress in your loved one, you may find yourself slowly becoming burnt out. Because of the demanding nature of caregiving, you may stop taking care of yourself because you are too busy caring for your loved one. As time goes on, you may want to take a break and regain some of your life back, but you may be met with concerns such as how you’ll pay for respite care, if those who are providing it are reliable or you may just feel guilty because you may feel as though you need to be able to do it all.

Maintaining Independence While Aging

Maintaining Independence While Aging

As loved ones begin aging, they may slowly lose the abilities to do things they once did, such as driving, cooking or even living at home. As a caregiver, you want to do everything you can to ensure that they are happy and have everything they need. During this time, you may be unsure of what to do or what not to do to help them, but one of the best things that you can do for your loved one is to help them and encourage them to remain as independent as they are able. This can be done by promoting fitness, social involvement and just plain doing things on their own.

Preventing Loved Ones from Wandering

Preventing Loved Ones from Wandering

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, at least six out of ten people with dementia will wander – more than 60% will wander from their homes and potentially get lost. What makes people wander varies as does who is at risk for wandering. It is the common belief that anyone with any sort of memory problem that is able to walk can be at an increased risk.

Coping with Caregiver Stress

Coping with Caregiver Stress

Being a full-time caregiver can be an extremely rewarding job. Knowing that you get to help your loved one through difficult times and be there for them when you are needed can make you feel good and helpful, however, it can also bring about some not-so-good symptoms. Those who are full-time caregivers are prone to more health problems and stress than those who are not caregivers. This is caused, most times, by neglecting their own well-being and focusing too much on the person that they are caring for.

The Value of Medication Management

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